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MANU - Johnny Idolf - 30/05/2016

 

Parole hearing

Under section 21(1) of the Parole Act 2002

Johnny Idolf MANU


Hearing: 30 May 2016 via AVL from Auckland Men’s Prison to [withheld]
 
Members of the Board: 
        Hon. MA Frater – Panel Convenor
        Assoc. Prof. P Brinded
        Mr J Thomson
       Mr L Tawera

In attendance:  
       [withheld]

Support People:  
       [withheld]
       [withheld]
       [withheld]


DECISION OF THE BOARD
1. Johnny Idolf Manu, aged 52, is serving a life sentence of imprisonment, with a minimum non parole period of 12½ years, imposed in September 1999 for the murder of Janet Pike, an ACC case worker, in Henderson on 24 June that year.

2. Mr Manu remains a special patient subject to section 45 of the Mental Health Act 1992. He is currently housed [withheld].  He is diagnosed as suffering from a chronic psychotic illness with a history of personality disturbance, polysubstance abuse and serious violent offending. 

3. While Mr Manu’s illness is largely controlled by medication, he continues to experience background hallucinations.  In the time since he last appeared before the Board there has been slow, but identifiable, progress, to the point where consideration is being given to moving him to [withheld], an unlocked ward [withheld].  In preparation for that, he is about to attend a refresher course with a violence prevention programme he previously completed.  Planning is also underway for him to meet with [withheld] later on this month. 

4. He is not causing any problems in the unit.  He works at [withheld] two days a week, shovelling compost, and wants to do that more frequently. 

5. He is compliant with medication and displays insight into his offending.  [withheld] 

6. Given his history of offending and, particularly, the nature of his index offence, it is acknowledged that his rehabilitation and eventual reintegration needs to be taken very slowly and carefully.  While it is difficult to estimate exactly how long that will take, he is unlikely to be suitable for parole in the foreseeable future.

7. He did not seek parole today and it is declined.  His next hearing will be in May 2018 and, in any event, must be before the 30th of that month.  Once again we ask that the hearing be face-to-face. 

8. We also told Mr Manu that the issue of postponement would be on the table again at that hearing.  He was subject to postponement orders in 2007 and 2011. He has the right to be represented by a lawyer at the next hearing and to have that person make written and/or oral submissions on his behalf. 

 

Hon. MA Frater
Panel Convenor